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The atom bomb from below

Sagane Ryokichi. 原子爆弾 [Genshi Bakudan]. Tokyo, Asahi Shinbunsha October 1945 (Showa 20). Octavo, publisher's printed wrapper (a short tear in a bottom edge and a tape repair in one corner); [6],58pp including wrapper*, photo illustrations and diagrams. Expected browning of the paper; quite a good copy.
*Pages 37-40 were neatly removed before the crude side stapling, deleted from all copies. These are the sections, "Genshi bakudan to Nihon" and "Genshi bakudan no koka" - the atomic bomb and Japan, and the effect of atomic bombs. Au$3750

Only edition I believe and some years in the finding, let me tell you. About a hundred years ago I decided that collecting the pamphlets and ephemera published round the world in 1945 on the atom bomb - first response so to speak - would be more fun and profitable a hobby than raising chickens. It took me a while to discover there was anything published in Japan. For some time I found nothing in any library catalogue and that, I thought, made sense. The one people unable or unwilling to rush into print would be the Japanese after August the 6th.
Then I came across a mention of this pamphlet by nuclear physicist Sagane Ryokichi. Now, finally, here it is. Exactly as it should be: unassuming, printed on cheap newsprint stock with diagrams, blurry uninformative photographs and, best of all, censored after printing.
Sagane was the recipient of the letter from physicist Luis Alvarez and two other former colleagues that was dropped in a canister over Nagasaki a minute before the bomb. The letter in part reads, "We implore you to confirm these facts to your leaders, and to do your utmost to stop the destruction and waste of life which can only result in the total annihilation of all your cities, if continued. As scientists, we deplore the use to which a beautiful discovery has been put, but we can assure you that unless Japan surrenders at once, this rain of atomic bombs will increase manyfold in fury."
Worldcat finds one copy outside Japan - in the Prange collection. That copy's cover is marked 'Deleted ' in English and Japanese with the page numbers.
The twist that the US occupation censors added that made Japanese writers and publishers wish for the good days of home made tyranny was that censorship itself was forbidden. That is, a publisher could not just blot out any offensive passages; all signs of censorship had to be removed which often meant a complete rewrite and reset.


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But wait ...

Takeo Takei. 原子爆弾 [Genshi Bakudan]. Tokyo, Domei Tsushinsha September 1945. Octavo printed wrapper; 32pp including wrapper. Expected browning of the paper; a very good copy. Small owner's seal on page three. Au$4850

As I was finishing my homework on the Sagane pamphlet above I came across a footnote on the last page of the last document in the last box on the last shelf in the last room - so to speak - referring to this. This time it was easy. All I had to do was ask every bookseller in Japan to search the darkest dustiest corners of their shops and within a couple of weeks I had this, unearthed from wherever it had been since, I suspect, about 1950. You too might be this lucky.
Published as Domei Sosho No.1 by Domei - the national news agency - on 20th September 1945, apparently the day before the US occupation censorship had time to be fully implemented. Domei Sosho no.2 was on the Potsdam declaration and there, I think, the series ended.
I have read that 200,000 copies of this were printed. Worldcat locates no copies - though there are copies in perhaps nine Japanese libraries - and it doesn't appear in the catalogue of the Prange collection - proclaimed the world's largest collection of occupation era documents, collected by the official historian to the occupation.
There is nothing much to be found in English on Takeo or his pamphlet. As I can best figure, the story is that Takeo was a scientific and/or political correspondent for Domei and spoke English. He and a colleague listened in to allied broadcasts, translated Truman's statement on the bombing of Hiroshima and was the first to tell the Japanese government that the "new bomb" was an atomic bomb.
Takeo's widow and son published a memorial book in 1995 with background and contemporary papers which doesn't seem to have worked its way to writers in English. From my stumbling through a review of that book I get the impression that Takeo was seen as an apologist for the US and their use of the bomb which was unfair. He was attempting to give as objectively as possible as much information as he could and what information he had came only from what could he could scrape together from radio broadcasts. How much of this view of him was long after the fact I don't know. He had been or became - I'm not clear on this - a communist journalist which can't have endeared him to any authorities.
There is a modern facsimile of this which may or may not be related to the book published by Mrs Takeo - it seems likely. That should not be mistaken for this. Neither should Takeo Takei the journalist be confused with Takeo Takei the illustrator.


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Minamimura Takashi. Original illustration for a double page spread in Shonen magazine. n.p. c1960? Illustration in ink and watercolour on two sheets of card, each 27x18cm with most of the right panel cut away for the text block. Taped onto a translucent sheet; a couple of editorial notes. Au$600

Minamimura is best known for his outer space and apocalyptic monster and alien illustrations but destruction by any high-tech means was right up his alley. Here is a fine bit of cold war Japanese atomic apocalypse art by one of the masters. Forget the background geography, that's Tokyo Tower crumpling. Tokyo Tower and the first successful intercontinental missile flight both date to 1958.


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Minamimura Takashi. ロボット怪獣 - サイボーグ怪獣 [Robotto Kaiju - Saibogu Kaiju]. Original illustration for the magazine Shonen. n.p. [c1960?]. Illustration in ink and watercolour on card 27x20cm, tapemarks in the margins. Lettering and inset illustration pasted on. Au$950

Minamimura was the master of apocalyptic aliens, monsters and outer space. No-one does devastation, cars and trains flying like debris and crumbling skyscrapers with more relish. A useful annotated diagram of our robot-cyborg monster is inset - the text can be read on a photocopy of the finished magazine page that comes with this. The pasted inset robot is a revision: held up to the light we can see a much bulkier monster underneath.
Minamimura calls this a cyborg monster which dates it to after May 1960 when it was supposedly first used by Clynes & Kline in a paper for the Space Flight Symposium and reported in the New York Times.


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解放 : 民主統一戰線のための戰鬪的大衆誌 [Kaiho : minshu toitsu sensen no tameno sentoteki taishushi]. Tokyo, Kaihosha, March 1946. Octavo publisher's illustrated wrapper; 96pp, b/w illustrations. A bit rumpled, less than expected browning of the cheap paper; quite a good copy. Au$300

No. 1 and all published of this troublemaking red magazine that carried the title in English: 'The Emancipaton [sic] (The Kaiho) The Combative Enlightening Magazine for Promoting the Victory of the Peoples Front.'
After some tight and dangerous years Japan's communists - those not killed or disgraced by their apostasy from prison - could come out from under their beds but American occupied Japan was no welcome red resort. This early and abrupt bit of red defiance appeared in time for the April 1946 general election in which the communist party won six seats and the socialists a healthy 96 seats. The socialists even formed government for a brief heady period.
During the war and for a few minutes after, Japanese communists were seen as allies but this magazine is exactly the sort of thing that soured the friendship. Officially there was no censorship in occupied Japan but likewise, officially all those plutocrat war criminals were purged from government and business and prosecuted. The Civil Censorship Detachment of the occupying forces censored everything they could find.
Worldcat finds no copies of this and I find only the NDL copy.


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IZIKOWITZ, Karl Gustav. Musical and Other Sound Instruments of the South American Indians. A comparative ethnographical study. Gothenburg, Elanders 1935. Large octavo publisher's printed wrapper; xii,433pp, 265 illustrations (from photos and drawings), three folding tables. A couple of small tears to wrapper edges but a sparkling copy. Au$100


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[Hedin]. DE MARGERIE, Emmanuel. L'Oeuvre de Sven Hedin et L'Orographie du Tibet. Paris 1929. Octavo printed wrapper; 139pp, illustrations & maps (a couple folding). Au$75

Extrait du Bulletin .. de Geographie.


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Myall Creek Massacre. Australian Aborigines ... Copies or Extracts of Despatches relative to the Massacre of various Aborigines of Australia, in the Year 1838, and respecting the Trial of their Murderers. London, Ordered by the House of Commons to be printed, 1839. Foolscap, sewn as issued; 56pp and the leaf with the docket title, folding coloured map. A few spots on the first and last pages, a very good copy. Au$2500

The map is of south eastern Australia showing intended military posts and towns between Sydney and Port Phillip. This may seem an odd addition to the report but it does belong: in July 1838 Governor Gipps reports on a "number of gentlemen" who wished to "open" the country around Port Phillip asking him to either "levy war on the blacks" or sanction and arm a militia. Gipps declined both requests but intends to establish military posts along the road to prevent any further "outrages" by Aborigines. He lists three recent outrages, the third committed not by but upon the Aborigines "with too much reason to fear that in this case 22 human beings, including several women and children, have been deliberately put to death by a party of white men". At that stage he is waiting for an official report. That follows.
From here the most remarkable thing about the Myall Creek Massacre is this document, and all the records in government files and in newspaper accounts. I don't think this is facile, or fatuous. Myall Creek wasn't the first or last atrocity committed against the Aborigines; nor was it the worst, if there can be such such a thing as worst. How do we count worst? Bodies, women, children, atrocious savagery? But we can see it fresh and be sickened by the horror because it is all recorded so thoroughly. Here we can see the coincidence of official directive, public attitude and the reactions to both, meeting a series of ifs.
If the murderers had taken more trouble to hide the evidence then perhaps Hobbs the station superintendent who returned to find the Aborigines missing and their remains seemingly yards away wouldn't have found them and been so sickened that he had to report the crime despite the bewildered entreaties of his servants. If this hadn't come at the time when Glenelg in London was specifically directing that Aborigines be treated as subjects of the Queen. If Gipps wasn't unhappy with a powerful group of settlers wanting to wage war and set up an armed militia - something that no government could countenance - then maybe a magistrate wouldn't have been despatched so promptly and the already scant evidence of the slaughter found would have been scattered and hidden forever.
As it was seven men were tried, twice, and executed by Christmas. That they were whites being executed for killing blacks caused public fury but that they were convicts made it easier. Would they have been executed otherwise?
I don't know who organised this report and whether I see or imagine a fine authorial hand. It ends with a letter from Henry Keck, the gaoler of the seven, who writes that all seven often acknowledged their guilt but weren't aware that "in destroying the aboriginals they were violating the law ... as it had (according to their belief) been so frequently done in the colony before."


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SCHIMMELPENNINCK, Mary Anne. Theory on the Classification of Beauty and Deformity, and their correspondence with physiognomic expression, exemplified in various works of art, and natural objects ... London, for J. & A. Arch 1815. Quarto contemporary half calf (a bit rubbed); xviii,441pp, two folding tables (the title calls for four and two of these are in the text) and 38 plates with hand colouring. Corner clipped from the half title; a pleasing, fresh copy. Au$2750

First edition; a re-written, pedestrian and more pious version was published after her death, in 1859. Mrs Schimmelpenninck offers a complete theory of taste rather than a work on physiognomy. Indeed much of the planned physiognomic section has been deferred. The theory here will "furnish a systematically arranged classification [and] fixed and definite rules .. of useful application not only in painting, sculpture, architecture, landscape gardening, poetry, .. but likewise .. in all those minor departments of good taste which constitute the agreeable everyday scenery of life".
This theory seems to have been evolving since her childhood and is supported by copious notes and quotations on Chinese gardens, Peruvians, catacombs, sweating sickness, and much more. She investigates the association of ideas, vision, form and motion, colour, hearing, touch, taste and smell, and the two large charts epitomise the whole theory. The plates are mostly soft ground etchings against strong wash backgrounds within a variety of borders.
Mrs Schimmelpenninck was too young to be one of the original bluestockings but she was very much their daughter; no social revolutionary but a pamphleteer for abolition and an historian of the Jansenists despite her quaker upbringing. This is her most ambitious and most singular work, it is singular enough in any context, but was no great success: "It was the opinion of some competent judges that this work showed more of her original talent and genius than any other of her published writings but it did not prove popular. It was encumbered by most voluminous notes containing a mass of information not likely perhaps to be generally interesting though testifying abundantly to the author's rare and extensive literary research." (Life of Mary Anne Schimmelpenninck; Christiana C. Hankin, 1858).


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NEURATH, Otto. Modern Man in the Making. London, Secker & Warburg 1939. Quarto, publisher's cloth and dustwrapper (this with a couple of small holes and chips); colour and b/w Isotype illustrations throughout. Top of the text block sometime bumped which, in the wrong light, detracts a bit from what would be an outstanding copy. Au$600

First English edition - or first edition, English issue if you like - of what must be Neurath's most desirable book which, as Lancelot Hogbin said, "combines all that is best in Descartes and the Daily Mirror." So many attempts to help humanity take a great evolutionary step forward vanish without trace but the descendants of Isotype, the universal graphic language created by the Neuraths and Gerd Arntz, have become ubiquitous, telling us when to cross the street and where to piss.


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DALE, George. The Industrial History of Broken Hill. Melbourne, Fraser and Jenkinson 1918. Octavo publisher's wrapper; 268pp, photo illustrations and adverts. Some natural browning but a very good copy. Au$120

"This work should become the text-book of agitators" (preface). The advertising, which has made publication possible, is a roughly equal mix of brewers and local firms who spell out their allegiance to the workers of 'The Barrier'.


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NISBET, Alexander. An Essay on the Ancient and Modern Use of Armories; Shewing Their Origin, Definition, and Division of them into their several Species ... Edinburgh, Printed by William Adams Junior 1718. Small quarto modern half calf; viii,224,[16]pp and seven engraved plates. General browning but still a fresh copy. Au$200

Poor Nisbet, he'd spent most of his adult life trying to raise funds for his great "complete System of Herauldry" in folio and managed by 1718 but two small works, his 'Cadency' of 1702 and this. Apparently this was so well regarded that his 'System' in folio appeared in 1722 but was to him incomplete and he set about raising support for a second volume. He died in 1725 and in 1742 a second volume appeared under his name, ostensibly prepared from his manuscript.
This manuscript was forged claptrap and Nisbet became, post mortem, a figure of ridicule and pity among the heraldic community for the next century or so.


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Barque "Norna." (Correspondence relative to). [with] ... Further Correspondence. Sydney, Govt printer 1861. Foolscap disbound; 6pp and 1 page on blue paper. Au$35

A sordid story of the treatment of Lascar seamen and, to me, surprising use of authority. Seems if a ship's officer complains to the Water Police that his crew are refusing to obey orders said crew is rounded up and thrown into gaol. The Norna's crew were arrested on the charge of Captain Crawford. The Water Police Magistrate's account here is more defensive than clear but it emerges after much to and froing that one seaman had possibly been murdered at sea and another came close to death in Sydney, due to mistreatment by the captain and second officer. They were held and charged. Then, the near dead sailor was put back on board the Norna, told that sea voyage would be good for his health and the Norna set sail with a new captain.
Probably not a great decision: the Norna was wrecked somewhere round the Coral Sea and most of the crew pretty much marooned by the new captain. But that's another story.


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FARJEON, B.L. [Benjamin Leopold]. Grif. A story of Australian Life. Seventeenth edition. London, Hutchinson 1898. Octavo publisher's cloth, spine decorated in gilt. A little browning at the very ends, quite a nice copy. Inscribed and signed by Farjeon with an accompanying letter. Au$350

A gift from Farjeon to Mrs Granville Ellis in 1901. The short letter on Farjeon's letterhead explains that it isn't always easy to find spare copies of his books but he is sending three, including this one, and Harry - doubtless Farjeon's son - is sending along some sheet music just published. Mrs Ellis must be the American born journalist, Anna May (or Mai?) Bosler, who married Granville Ellis twice and wrote under the name Max Eliot. Elizabeth Pennell described her as "that awful American newspaper woman ... a vile specimen! Vulgar!"
Gifted copies of Farjeon's books have a longer history than Farjeon himself. Decades later Harry used his father's own copies as school prizes.


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HALL, Owen. [ie Hugh Hart Lusk]. Eureka. London, Chatto & Windus 1899. Octavo publisher's green decorated cloth blocked in blind. A second hand copy with something of a lean, with some browning and smudges; an unmarked lending library label inside the front cover suggests no-one ever borrowed it. No other library marks; a solid decent copy. Au$2000

Only edition, probable first issue. I've seen another copy in a cheaper binding with a 32 page publisher's list that include's Hall's next book, Hernando, published in 1902. A pioneering Australian science fiction novel say some and rare say I: missed by Miller and MacCartney and Trove finds only the NL copy. It was picked up by the Bibliography of Australian Literature which cites the British Library copy.
This is a lost race thriller with enough techno-wizardry to qualify as sci-fi proper and with an ancient Greek civilisation in Western Australia.
Lusk did spend time in Australia and wrote a couple of Australian novels, along with a fair bit of social and political commentary, but perhaps belongs more to New Zealand. There he went into politics during the seventies then came to Australia in the 1890's. Did he go back to New Zealand afterwards (apparently he died in Auckland) or go on to America where he published quite a bit of stuff under his own name? He was a busy writer, a few novels and much polemic and pamphleteering - and much of that was pretty reactionary and xenophobic.


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THOMAS, Edward A. At Swords' Point. A novel. Philadelphia, Claxton &c, 1877. Octavo publisher's green cloth. A bit of browning at the ends, minor signs of use; a rather good copy. Au$250

First edition of this scarce thriller that begins with a desperate chase and gets complicated soon. A villain is accused of murder and our hero, a young lawyer, is happy to prosecute him ... until he looks at the evidence.


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HUME, Fergus. The Dwarf's Chamber. London, Ward Lock [189-?]. Octavo publisher's colour illustrated glazed boards with cloth spine (this a touch faded); illustrations by Percy F.S. Spence and others. The title page - on cheaper paper - a bit browned, a bit of a lean, a little wear to corners and edges, a rather good copy. Au$185

A re-issue of the original 1896 sheets with a cancel title page and part of the appealing Ward Lock 2/- Copyright Novels series. This is the copy illustrated in John Loder's survey of the 2/- series.
This is sort of intriguing as an exercise in marketing. The "other stories" - ie The Dwarf's Chamber and Other Stories as it was first titled - have been dumped - from the title, not the book. Perhaps a glut of short story collections on the market. The Dwarf's Chamber is the longest by far piece in the book but there are some other useful titles in there: Dead Man's Diamonds - too many diamonds in the thriller market ... Tale of the Turquoise Skull - too obvious a short story ... the Green-Eyed God and the Stockbroker - again too obvious as is the Ivory Leg and the Twenty-Four Diamonds - and there's diamonds again.


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TURNER, George Frederic. The Toad and the Amazon. London, Ward Lock 1907. Octavo publisher's decorated cloth blocked in white and gilt (minor signs of use, a little white gone from the spine); frontispiece and one other plate. A pretty good copy. Au$250

First edition. I'm not sure why Turner's books have disappeared so thoroughly. The style is a bit precious but no more than most of his contemporaries and the repartee is often witty and amusing. The necessary conceit - or gimmick - to keep us reading: a pair of society gentlefolk disguise themselves to follow their passion - boxing - might seem ordinary until we discover that one is a beautiful young woman.
In case our interest flags, cut to the meeting of the high society Entomophagites where the abolition of section C of Rule 15 is being argued. Section C is the requirement that any outsider who stumbles over or into the Entomophagites is summarily executed. Needless, maybe, to say, our hero is going to be lured into blundering into the Entomophagite stronghold by his rival for the beautiful Amazon.
Turner, a London architect, published a decent number of novels between 1906 and 1920, most with some thrilling or macabre twist, and all apparently sank with barely a ripple.


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FARJEON, B.L. [Benjamin Leopold]. Something Occurred. [and] Something Occurred. Third edition. London, Routledge 1894. Two volumes colour illustrated glazed boards; the first with wear to edges and quite good the other more rubbed and worn about the edges. The first with 331pp and adverts dated July 1894; the second with 328pp on noticeably cheaper paper and adverts dated August 1896. Au$250

I want to make it clear that this is not my discovery, the work here was done by Rowan Gibbs. Now. The first copy here is, I believe, first edition - 1893 - sheets with a cancel title. There our interest might end except the next copy - the 'third edition' is revised and reset. The revisions aren't dramatic as far as I can see but they are there. That a publisher would take this on for a yellowback reprint is a surprise to me.
Something Occurred is a light fantasy involving magical snuff which owes more than a bit to the identity exchange and transformation novels of F. Anstey.


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ASTOR, John Jacob. A Journey in Other Worlds. A romance of the future. London, Longman 1894. Octavo publisher's blue cloth elaborately blocked in silver and lettered in gilt; 10 illustrations, nine by Dan Beard; 24 page publisher's list dated September 1894 at the end. Edges a bit rubbed and the title page a bit browned. Quite a good copy. Au$125

First English edition, pretty much concurrent with the New York edition. William Waldorf Astor has been described as the richest novelist ever and without knowing the breakdown of the family fortunes I can't argue that, but John Jacob may well be the richest science fiction writer still.
William's pair of novels were no great shakes and neither is this in literary terms. But it is a scientific and utopian romance involving a voyage to Jupiter and Saturn, no worse than most of the didactic science fiction of the period and does provide enough thrills and plenty of monsters. It is set in the year 2000 and Astor's vision of world history over the intervening century can be, with equal or no profit, admired or derided.
Astor was caned by the New York Times reviewer - affronted by his view that time wasted learning the classics would be better spent learning science - who remarked that Astor's description of a "weird scene might also serve in a description of a Dutch Christmas festival."


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Librarians ... to your edit modes!

SHEHADI, B. [Beshara]. The Confession of Pontius Pilate. First written, as alleged, in Latin by Fabricius Albinus, a playmate of Pilate; translated into Arabic ... and rendered into English ... by B. Shehadi, ... now of Sydney, N.S.W. Sydney, printed by Geo. Booth 1893. Small octavo publisher's printed wrapper; 64pp. Some foxing but a nice copy. At the end Shehadi advertises Arabic lessons. Au$385

First edition of this biblical fantasia and neglected bit of Australian fiction. I first supposed that B. Shehadi, lately student of Beyrout, was as much an invention as Fabricius Albinus but it seems not. He was, according to an online family history, born in Syria - now Lebanon - in 1871, came to Australia in 1891 and left in 1898. Not mentioned in the family history is that Shehadi ran into some police trouble in June 1898. He ended up a carpet dealer in Orange, New Jersey where he died in 1955. In the meantime he published second, third and fourth editions of this, in 1917, 1943 and 1954.
This is not unknown to bibliographers but apparently once miscatalogued it has stayed there ever since. All Trove library entries list this as the work of Albinus. Ferguson, who ignored fiction, included it while Miller and Macartney never included it in Australian Literature. It remains a gap in Austlit.
The fictional histories created by authors attempting to pass off a novel as fact are usually picked up immediately but I guess when it comes to stuff biblical, eyes cross and it is put onto an apocrypha shelf in the dark wastes of theology. So. Here we have a Syrian/Lebanese colonial Australian novel. How many of those have you seen?


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Roman republic of 1849. Rome en 1849 [binding title for a collection of seven items]. 1. Actes Officiels de la Republique Romaine depuis le 9 Fevrier jusqu'au 2 Juillet 1849. Paris, Amyot [1849]; 195pp. 2. de Lesseps, Ferdinand. Ma Mission a Rome Mai 1849. Paris, Amyot 1849; 168pp. 3. Reponse de M. F. de Lesseps au Ministere et au Conseil d'Etat. Aout 1849. Paris, Amyot 1849; 38,[2]pp. 4. Cernuschi (Henri August Primus) Representant du Peuple Romain juge par le Conseil de Guerre de L'Armee Francaise a Rome 1850. Paris, printed by Briere; pp3-22, drop title. 5. Rome a la France. Revelations sur la question Romaine, par un constituant de Rome recueilles et publiees par S.-F. Bernard. folio newsheet; 8pp. 6. Supplement au Censeur du Dimanche 12 Aout 1849. Discours de M. Jules Favre sur les affaires de Rome. Lyon; folio newsheet; 4pp. 7. Supplement au Censeur du Samedi 29 Septembre 1849. J. Mazzini a MM. Tocqueville et Falloux. Lyon; folio newsheet; 2pp. v.p. Together in octavo contemporary half morocco (the three newsheets folded in). Bookplate of Joseph Gleason with consequent minimal library markings (faint signs of a spine number). A typed contents list inserted. Au$300

I won't even try to summarise the history of the Republic of Rome in 1849 and its war with France. It's complicated.


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Catalogue - wine. Establissements Nicolas. Liste des Grands Vins Fins 1932. Paris, Nicolas (printed by Draeger) [1932]. Small quarto publisher's colour illustrated wrapper, spiral bound, with oval peek-a-boo cutout; 32pp, eight full page colour illustrations, smaller decorations by Edy Legrand. Corner bumped. Au$80

The wine merchants of wine merchants, Nicolas, produced these catalogues of their great wines annually from 1927 to 1973. 1932 is neo-fauve bacchanalian with Legrand at his splodgiest.


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Catalogue - wine. Establissements Nicolas. Liste des Grands Vins Fins 1935. Paris, Nicolas (printed by Draeger) [1935]. Small quarto publisher's stiff wrapper, plastic spiral binding; 36pp, six full page, smaller colour illustrations by Darcy. Corner bumped. Au$80

The wine merchants of wine merchants, Nicolas, produced these catalogues of their great wines annually from 1927 to 1973. 1935 is particularly high Deco with more than a hint of the epic grandeur of the working man.


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Catalogue - wine. Establissements Nicolas. Liste des Grands Vins Fins 1936. Paris, Nicolas (printed by Draeger) [1936]. Small quarto publisher's colour illustrated wrapper, plastic spiral bound; 54pp including endpapers, some double folded leaves carry four page numbers, Design, decorations decorations and typography by Cassandre. Corner bumped. Au$110

The wine merchants of wine merchants, Nicolas, produced these catalogues of their great wines annually from 1927 to 1973. 1936 is more extensive and stately than its immediate neighbours.


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London - Melbourne Air Race. Nederlands Succes. Melbourne Race. n.p. [1934?]. Colour lithograph on card 47x31cm, with a mounted colour illustration. Edges a bit knocked with a short tear in one corner; hanging strip or card stand on the back pretty much gone. Au$600

A shop placard for a new brand of cigars that celebrates the Dutch success in the Melbourne Centenary or MacRobertson Air Race. The Dutch KLM plane Uiver arrived second and won on handicap. The onlaid colour illustration is, I suppose, the cigar box label. I found a couple of adverts in newspapers dating into 1936 for Melbourne Race cigars but nothing else.


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Shikoku & Wakayama. Nakamura Kisen, Inoue Seiji & Yokoyama Kei. 漫画旅行 - 日本全国 [Manga Ryoko - Nihonzenzu ... ]. [Tokyo c1930?]. Colour printed broadside map 55x77cmcm. Folded. A bit rumpled and used but pretty good. Au$135

A fun tourist map of the Boso and Miura Peninsulas with Tokyo in between. Nakamura, Inoue and Yokoyama collaborated on a series of these manga maps of Japan, likely thirteen altogether. I don't know whether they fit together to make a giant romp round Japan.


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KIDD, B.J. A History of the Church to A.D.461. Oxford Univ Press 1922. Three volumes octavo publisher's cloth. Au$200


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[MITCHELL, John Murray]. The Gospel According to St. John in English and Marathi. (The Marathi expressed in Roman characters.) Bombay, printed for the Bombay Auxiliary Bible Society at the Exchange Press, 1861. Octavo, doubtless original unlettered pebble cloth (marked and blotched but solid); 4,163pp & errata leaf. Small engraved monogram pasted on the title - an arrangement of the initials A.R.A.D. Au$165

Rare it seems. A search of likely catalogues finds only two copies, both in England. The second edition of 1882 is a touch more plentiful. Mitchell, as well as having a distinguished pedigree in translation and scholarly writings on India, was something of a missionary trouble shooter. He retired - first in 1863 - at least twice and was called back to India in times of crisis, only making his final departure from the place in 1888, fifty years after he first got there.


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GOODHART, James Frederic. On Common Neuroses or the neurotic element in disease and its rational treatment. London, Lewis 1892. Octavo plain wrapper with folded parchment outer wrapper printed in red & black; 128pp. Spotting and some pencilling. Au$50

The Harveian Lectures for 1891.


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RIGAUD, Stephen Peter. Account of Some Early Proposals for Steam Navigation. Oxford, for the Ashmolean Society 1838. Octavo publisher's printed wrapper; 15pp. Au$65

Some descriptions as early as the mid 16th century are noted with the more expected early 18th century proposals.


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Sugoroku. 家庭電化すごろく [Katei Denka Sugoroku]. Chubudenryoku [195-?]. Colour broadside 54x76cm. Folded as issued. Au$195

If ever you thought there might be a subject that couldn't be turned into an exciting game, here's the proof you were wrong. This game of household electrification is a tour of the power stations of the Chubu Electric Power Co.
The games that children don't want to play are, just like the books they don't want to read, often common. Sometimes, I suspect, ingratitude overpowers manners and the unwanted gift goes straight to the nearest landfill. This may have been the way this game was treated. I can't find any other copy.
"Why would you want to?" I hear you ask.


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Monkey Game. Het Apenspel. n.p. [188-?]. 61x46cm colour litho game on paper. Edges a bit ragged and some repaired clean tears. Au$150

A Dutch racing game for devotees of monkeys - and who isn't? It seems counter intuitive these days but the object is to get into the zoo.


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Taniwaki Sobun. 處世教訓漫画双六 [Shosei Kyokun Manga Sugoroku]. Tokyo, Dai Nihon Yubenkai Kodansha1929 (Showa 4). Colour broadsheet 54x80cm. Somewhat used with small tears and holes in the folds. On the back is a gallery of masterpieces - a dozen colour illustrations and proverbs. Au$135

This new year gift from the magazine Kodansha Club is an oddly blurry but still fun cartoon journey through many mysterious - to me - vicissitudes of life.
I have found a couple of images of other copies and this copy stands up pretty well in comparison. I'd guess that being fun and demanding close attention this was a game to be handled to death.
Taniwaki is maybe best known for his senryu manga - illustrations to short poems.


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Catalogue - farm machinery. Weir Plow Co, Monmouth Ill. Plows, Cultivators, Harrows, Three-wheeled Riding, Tongueless, Single and Gang Plows ... etc., etc. The company [c1890]. Large octavo publisher's illustrated wrapper, 67pp, well illustrated. Unfortunately a mouse, my guess, nibbled the edge of this and stuck a few pages together which have been torn, without loss, by an over eager reader. Still a decent copy.
With two update leaves dated February and December 1891 pasted in at the end as instructed. And with the date stamp - 11 Jul 1891 - on the front of agent A.G. Webster & Son of Hobart. Au$50

A particularly handsome plow catalogue, and I don't say such things lightly, with two full page minor masterpieces of midwest wood engraving. Webster & Son - now Webster Ltd - went big in the 1880s publishing their own Tasmanian Agriculturist and Machinery Gazette and importing just about everything farm that there was.


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Walpole & Strawberry Hill. A Catalogue of the Classic Contents of Strawberry Hill collected by Horace Walpole. London [George Robins 1842]. Quarto undistinguished modern cloth with original printed wrappers bound in; xxiv,250pp, portrait, illustrations through the prefatory pages. Somewhat used and dogeared but decent enough; and with a number of pencilled annotations and prices; inked onto the endpaper the totals for each day's sales. Au$300

The library and contents of Walpole's treasure house; the foundation of Gothick - not to be confused with the more prosaic gothic revival - sold by auction over 24 days. Included in the prefatory material is a description of Strawberry Hill by Harrison Ainsworth. This is the later and preferred - by bookists - version with days seven and eight (prints) deferred and the first six day's entries - the library - much improved in detail.


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DUNCAN, Sinclair Thomson. Journal of a Voyage to Australia by the Cape of Good Hope. Six months in Melbourne and return to England by Cape Horn, including scenes and sayings on sea and land. Edinburgh, James Gemmell 1884. Octavo publisher's gilt cloth (rebacked with calf); 217,4pp, tinted frontis & folding map. A neat copy. Au$98

First published in 1869 and here "much enlarged, by adding more...strange and stirring scenes". Duncan seems a sanctimonious and patronising bore incapable of writing on anything with perception or intelligent discrimination. There is also something specious about his professed plan. Why would anybody, let alone a commercial traveller, sail right around the world stopping only in Melbourne, and for six months, merely with a view to self publish a journal? - the first edition was 'For the Author'.
Still, I am trying to sell this, so - a detailed account of his voyage and a view of Melbourne in the sixties of, I'm sure, interest to someone.


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Minamimura Takashi. 自動たいほ器 [Jido Taiho-ki]. Original illustration for a double page spread in Shonen magazine. n.p. [195-?] Pair of illustrations in ink and gouache on card, each 32x22cm. Tape marks on the backs. Au$500

Minamimura is best known for his outer space and apocalyptic monster and alien illustrations but it's clear he could work happily with any new wizzbang invention. And what could be better than this FBI automatic crook catcher for banks? How many bank robbers would it catch before they started looking at the counter skirting and standing a foot or two to the right?


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THOMSON, Sir William, Baron Kelvin. Mathematical and Physical Papers. Collected from various scientific periodicals from May, 1841, to the present time. Cambridge Univ Press 1882 - 1911. Six volumes octavo publisher's green cloth. An excellent, bright set. Au$1850

Thomson saw the first three volumes through the press and included supplementary articles written for that third volume. Then there was a twenty year gap till volume four (in which, of course, the subtitle has been dropped) when Joseph Larmor took over, arranging and annotating the remaining papers.


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KRASNOV, Pyotr Nikolayevich, Oki Atsuo & Onchi Koshiro. 双頭の鷲より赤旗へ [Soto no Washi Yori Akahata e]. Tokyo, Ars 1930. Octavo publisher's printed cloth in white, yellow, red and black; printed card slipcase; title page printed in red and black. A bit of wear to the case, a touch of browning or dustiness to the book. Neat owner's name on box and back endpaper. A rather good copy. Au$400

First and probably only edition - and near impossible to find in decent condition - of volume one of Krasnov's virulent anti-communist novel, published in English in two volumes as From Double Eagle to Red Flag. Volume two in Japanese apparently never made it to print.
A splendid bit of book design by Onchi Koshiro and a curious convergence of over sized personalities. Krasnov was the commander of the Russian army who carried his fight against the Bolsheviks to Europe and cozied up with the Nazis. He surrendered to the British with the promise he wouldn't be turned over to the Soviets. He was and was executed in 1947. The translator, Oki Atsuo, was a decidedly nationalist poet whose military songs and verses won awards during the war and seemingly worked against him afterwards. He ended up writing school songs.
If artist, printmaker and designer, Onchi, had any politics they haven't been translated into English. He was at the head of modern Japanese art from the teens pretty much up until his death in 1955. Still he has managed to create what could be taken as a strident fascist emblem until we look at the box where that Soviet flag looks almost heroic behind those bars.
Onchi designed a few books for Ars between 1919 and 1934 and given house styles for their art titles - from drab to downright ugly - I wonder why they hired him in the first place and then why they didn't use him a lot more.
Note how Onchi used the as yet unset modernisation of reading and writing. The title reads left to right on the box and on the title it reads left to right on the black band and reverses on the red band.


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SWIFT, Benjamin [ie William Romaine Paterson]. The Tormentor. London, Fisher Unwin 1897. Octavo publisher's cloth. A rather good copy. Au$125

First edition of this mildly disappointing tragic thriller. Disappointing for fans of traditional crime thrillers fooled by the title and chapter headings. But we are given poison and death and any book that received reviews like, "Its story is unwholesome and its style deplorable. One hates to receive such a book for review, for it is filled with darkness, meanness and crime," can't be without value.


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Jewellery. The Jewellers, Goldsmiths, Silversmiths, and Watchmakers' Monthly Magazine. Vol. I. [All published?]. London, Henry Lea 1863. Quarto contemporary cloth (spine worn and chipped at the ends); [8],188pp and 21 plates - five colour. Smudges, mild stains and signs of use; very decent. Au$1200

Apparently a complete run of this rare trade journal. The Winterthur Library also has a copy of volume 1. No-one else does so well. Now, this must have begun life as The Jewellers', Goldsmiths', Silversmiths' and Modellers' Journal of Art and Manufacture - also published in 1863 by Henry Lea. Even someone as busy as Lea can't have had two identical journals running at the same time. The V&A has three numbers of that.
Doubtless spurred by the interest generated by the 1862 exhibition - also a rich source of material - Lea squeezed this enterprise in between his 1862 and his 1864 bankruptcies. I'd guess unresponsive modellers were dumped along the way in the hope that watchmakers would come aboard.
The 1862 exhibition was mined assiduously and there is a brief dismissal of Australian efforts at goldsmithing. More telling perhaps are continuing remarks on the staggering amount of gold coming out of the colony. Whoever edited this worked hard and gathered stuff critical, historical, technical and social from all over the place.
Is this the first English language trade journal for jewellers and smiths? There was a Weimar Zeitschrift in the 1840s but I can't find anything else in English, nor any other language, much before the 1870s.


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Catalogue - spectacles etc. Societe des Lunetiers, Paris. Societe des Lunetiers. The company [192-?]. Cloth screw binder 28x20cm; 350pp, illustrated throughout. A nice copy. Au$325

An exemplary catalogue of everything for improved vision and those in the trade. Spectacles, goggles, lens of all kinds, and all the bits and pieces for ophthalmologists and optomerists.
The Societe was a conglomerate that began as co-operative in the mid 19th century and set out to conquer the optical world. They are still doing so under some forgettable name. There is no mention here of their radical new Stigmal lens which dates this before 1927.


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Catalogue - Pharmaceuticals. Weeks & Potter, Boston. Revised Catalogue of Foreign and Domestic Drugs, selected powders, fine essential oils, waters and extracts ... wines and liquors, proprietry medicines, druggists shop furniture ... sundries and surgical appliances, sponges, fancy goods, and toilet articles. Boston 1890. Octavo publisher's limp cloth, the front titled in black (spine browned and a bit rubbed); 468,130pp, profusely illustrated with wood engravings and a handsome full page colour lithograph of a bottle of their Beef, Iron and Wine. Used but solid and very decent. The second section consists of advertisements. Au$300

The advertisements include a warning by Dr S.A. Richmond of Tuscola, Illinois, against fraudulent companies selling bogus versions of his justly celebrated Samaritan Nervine. He prints the text of a judgment against such a company and invites the many thousands of those he has saved from epilepsy, insanity and death to join him "lashing these ignorant, impotent, piratical scoundrels through the earth with a whip of scorpions."


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Catalogue - Photo albums. Seiundo Co. Tokyo. Catalogue of Album. Tokyo [193-?]. 16x10.5cm publisher's colour illustrated wrapper with metal pin; 18 leaves printed one side, b/w photo illustrations. Au$50

A neat little catalogue of photo and other albums in a varitey of styles, available in different sizes. Japan was by the thirties camera crazy as well having a large population of avid ephemera collectors. A good time to be in the album business.


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Catalogue - magic. Bernard's, Melbourne. Bernard's Quality Magic. Melbourne, [c1940?]. Quarto publisher's illustrated wrapper; 40pp, illustrated throughout. An old fold, a couple of small splodges, quite good. Au$150

Bernard's opened in 1937 and vanished only recently. This, as far as I can see, seems to be their only catalogue.


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Catalogue - home cinema. Pathescope, Sydney. The Pathescope General Catalogue 1931 [with] Pathescope Home Cinema Film Catalogue. [London] 1931 & Sydney [1931?]. Octavo publisher's colour illustrated wrapper (worn with some insect nibbles); 18pp & 16pp self wrapper. The English printed list has illustrations of the projector and accessories, and a three page Australian price list pasted inside the back cover. All somewhat rumpled and used, a few short tears, and completely acceptable. Au$125

The genesis of home cinema. Pathe developed their first home film projector in 1911 and by 1931 were pretty much out of the game. Kodak put paid to them with 16mm film in the mid twenties in the US and the European home film business was sold in 1929 and died altogether in 1934. The Sydney list urges customers to join the film exchange library and I suspect such libraries lingered on a while after Pathescope itself was gone. I can't find any Pathescope catalogues in Trove or OCLC, am I looking in the wrong place?


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LANGE, Otto. Dekorationsmalereien fur das Burgerhaus. Stuttgart, Julius Hoffmann [1907?]. Folio 49x33cm, loose as issued in publisher's portfolio, decorated boards, printed label, (cloth spine detaching but lining and hinges firm enough); title and 24 chromolithograph plates printed by the firm Emil Hochdanz of Stuttgart. Title with some creasing round the very edges, two plates with insignificant crease in one corner. Au$750

A handsome pattern book of modern painted interiors by the young designer, later expressionist painter and printmaker. Maybe this is all a bit tasteful but it is quite smart. If Lange has stuck to handsome tasteful interiors, perhaps gone a bit more Bavarian folk art, he might not have lost his professorship in textile design come 1933 and ended up in the Degenerate Art bin.


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Toy book. The Hearty Old Boy Who Looked Always the Same. London, Dean & Son [c1865-70]. 25x17cm colour illustrated boards; advertisement front endpapers and eight leaves, the last mounted inside the back cover, each with a handcoloured wood engraving and verse. A head made of some composition with tiny glass eyes is mounted inside the back board and a hole cut through all pages and the front cover. Inner lining and stitching somewhat loose but holding well enough. Quite a good copy. Au$1200

This grotesque bit of gimmickry must have been less disturbing when new. Maybe. Two companion titles are listed on the front cover but I don't think these things took off in any big way. All are rare. I've found a couple of images of one title and they don't look any less worrying than this. I've found no images of another copy of this or the third title.
This charts the progress of ploughman Jackey Hodge to Sir John Hodge, mayor of the town. Why he started life a Hearty Old Boy is beyond me.


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KENDRICK, John B. History of the Wallingford Disaster. Hartford, Case Lockwood & Brainard 1878. Slender octavo publisher's brown cloth titled in gilt on the front; 76 pages and eight fabulous wood engraved plates. Au$275

Only edition of this most appealing and essential piece of disaster literature and of storm literature. Wallingford, Connecticut, was wiped out in minutes on August 9th, 1878 by a tornado - Kendrick calls it cyclone or tornado randomly - which killed at least 29 people (warning: many of the descriptions are gruesome).
The wood engravings, though, are wonderful; the best of the Police Gazette school. They are after photos and they have both an extraordinary vivacity and stillness. The now still detritus of terrific destruction matches the calm insouciance of the observers; the awkward forms are engraved with absolute surety. These are the exact qualities that later generations of artists consciously tried to capture, some did better than weak imitation but not much better.


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Aviation Sugoroku. 訪欧大飛行記念飛行双六 Ho-o Daihiko Kinen Hiko Sugoroku. Osaka, Asahi Shimbun 1925 (Taisho 14). Broadside 54x79cm; printed in colour. Some expected browning, small holes in a fold; pretty good. With two small planes in the bottom margin which could be cut out for playing pieces. Why only two? Au$350

A sugoroku - racing game - celebrating the first Japanese flight to Europe by four aviators in two planes in 1925. We start in Tokyo and follow the aviators across Russia, zigzag around Europe and finish in Rome. This was issued as a treat by the newspaper Asahi Shimbun who sponsored the flight.


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Sunday Chewing Gum. サンデーチウィンガム [Sande Chiuingamu]. Yamazaki Seika Kenkyujo [193-?]. Colour lithograph poster 56x19cm. Some minor creasing and natural browning of the paper, rather good with the original metal strips and loop. Au$150

A shop poster for Sunday Chewing Gam (sic) against an unexpected wintery background. I guess chewing gum really has no season.


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Wada Sanzo. 色彩配合板 [Shikisai Haigo-ban]. Tokyo &c [193-?]. 250x175mm, publisher's colour illustrated boards which open to three panels: one with explanatory text; a framed panel with eight colour strips which holds eight separate coloured cellophane(?) filters in card frames; and a rotating volvelle with cellophane colour filters. The three panels separated, a couple of cellophane pieces cracked. A definitely used copy but a complete copy. Au$150

A nifty device for blending colours. Wada is coupled here with the British Colour Council - both names appear. Wada founded the Japan Standard Color Association - now the Japan Color Research Institute - in 1927, before the BCC existed and the relationship may be known to some Japanese researcher but I can't find out anything. Nor can I find any record of this.


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